Church Monuments

  • Church Monuments,  Churches,  Heritage,  Heritage Crime,  History,  Post-Medieval History,  The Churches Conservation Trust

    Badley’s Missing Shield

    On 13th September 2019 the Suffolk Mercury newspaper reported that an historical stone shield with a value in the region of £1000 had been stolen from St. Mary’s church in Badley, Suffolk. The newspaper report claimed ‘The carved stone crest was taken from St Marys Church in Badley at some point between Saturday, June 1 and Saturday, September 7 [2019]‘. An identical article appeared on the same day in the Stowmarket Mercury and both coincided with a Tweet by The Churches Conservation Trust, the owner of St. Mary’s, lamenting the news. The appeal for information on the whereabouts of the shield and more importantly, the perpetrator of the theft, was…

  • Artefact Photography,  Church Monuments,  Churches,  Heritage,  History,  Medieval History

    de la Pole Monumental Brass

    at Holy Trinity, Chrishall, Essex A late-medieval brass set into the floor at the west end of the south aisle at Holy Trinity, Chrishall, Essex, commemorating John de la Pole (d. 1379) and his wife Joan Cobham. More here – https://chrishallessex.co.uk/joan-cobham-chrishall/ The Chrishall brass is not in its original position, probably a chantry chapel founded and funded by the de la Pole family. Chantries were dissolved in the sixteenth-century Reformation. In comparison, St. Mary’s church in Cobham, Kent, where Joan was born and grew up, provides the best evidence of the culture of commemorative monumental brasses in this period. The chancel floor is home to the best collection of memorial…

  • Church Monuments,  Churches,  Heritage,  Heritage Crime,  The Churches Conservation Trust

    Church Photography

    English parish churches are the custodians of some of the world’s most outstanding works of art – stained glass, monuments, tiles, woodwork, furniture and the architecture itself, often dating back a thousand or more years. They can be treasure troves of artefacts of local, national and international significance. Promoting this to visitors is a way to keep our churches open, loved and most importantly, conserved and maintained. Visitor experience will always be enhanced by interpretation materials with high-quality imagery. I am an accomplished photographer specialising in historic buildings, mainly churches, their interiors, exteriors, details and landscape settings. I produce high-resolution digital imagery for prints, printed literature and digital publication. I…

  • Church Monuments,  Churches,  Heritage,  History,  Post-Medieval History,  The Churches Conservation Trust

    Henry Audley’s Monument at Berechurch Essex

    Henry Audley’s magnificent memorial stands in St. Michael’s Church, Berechurch, a mile or two south of Colchester in Essex. “His date of death is not known but, as he is known to have been alive in 1664, this monument, erected in 1648, took shape some years before he died. Flanked by flaming urns, his armour-clad effigy reclines on its side, looking out. His head rests upon his helmet and one of his gauntlets rests upon his sword. Beneath are the figures of his five children – Katherine, Marian, Abigail, Thomas and Henry, one of whom carries a skull, indicating that he had already died. Above is the Latin inscription, crowned…

    Comments Off on Henry Audley’s Monument at Berechurch Essex
  • Church Monuments,  Churches,  Heritage,  History,  Post-Medieval History,  The Churches Conservation Trust

    William Burges’ Rose Window

    The rose window high in the west end of the church of Christ the Consoler, Skelton-cum-Newby, dates to the mid 1870s and was made by Saunders & Co. to a design by Frederick Weekes. Christ the Consoler is shown enthroned in a central position in a mandorla presiding over representations of the stages of life on the inner circle and people from all over the world on the outer. This church was designed by William Burges (1827-1881) for Lady Mary Vyner, in memory of her son Frederick. He had been kidnapped by brigands in Greece during his Grand Tour and, aged only twenty-three years, murdered during a rescue attempt. Lady…

  • Church Monuments,  Churches,  Heritage,  The Churches Conservation Trust

    High Ambition, Low Elswick

    St. Stephen’s tower, Low Elswick, is one of the most overlooked and rarely mentioned buildings in the CCT’s portfolio of historic churches, despite the local and international significance of those who built it. It remains a landmark for those travelling to and from Newcastle city centre towards the A1 and retains a ring of eight bells cast in 1880 by Taylor’s of Loughborough. Designed by local architect, R. J.Johnson, the foundation stone for St. Stephen’s church was laid on 19th November 1866 by Sir William Armstrong. Armstrong’s empire had flourished upon engineering brilliance, he having invented the hydraulic crane and the Armstrong breech-loading gun, both being watershed developments for heavy…

  • Church Monuments,  Churches,  Heritage,  Heritage Crime,  History,  Medieval History,  The Churches Conservation Trust

    The Case of the Cowthorpe Brass

    19th-century metal theft The theft of antiquities from churches isn’t a new problem. On Saturday 9th June 1860, the York Herald reported on such a crime, with the headline, “Sacrilege at Cowthorpe”: “Within the last few days, the Parish Church of Cowthorpe, near Tadcaster, was entered by thieves, and the following property stolen : — A white metal flagon and basin, a pewter plate, and a quantity of brass from off the tomb of Brian Rowclyff, who founded the church in the year 1445. On one of the pieces of brass, a narrow plate, is engraven in Old English characters, a Latin inscription, and upon another brass plate, which is…